Nutrition 14 results

Eat Whole Grains, Live Longer?

Nicholas Bakalar for the NY Times Two large review studies have reached the same conclusion: Eating whole grains is associated with significant reductions in the risk for premature death. One report, in BMJ, found that whole grain consumption was associated with a reduction in the risk for death from cancer, coronary heart disease, respiratory disease, infectious disease and diabetes. Using data from 45 studies, researchers calculated that compared with eating none, eating 90 grams of whole ...

Aaron Rodgers Comments on Changes to Diet, Impact on His Health

In an effort to maximize the duration of his playing career, Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers has made a concerted effort to eat healthier.... Read More....

The healthiest way to cook veggies and boost nutrition.

Whether you love vegetables or not, there's one thing you know for sure: Veggies are really good for you. And you can make them even more nutritious if you prepare them in ways that maximize their benefits. Read More.....

Prescribing Vegetables, Not Pills

By JANE E. BRODY, for NY Times Alaijah Borden was 10 years old and significantly overweight when Dr. Sundari Periasamy, a pediatrician at Harlem Hospital Center in New York, enrolled the middle-schooler in an innovative program to increase her consumption of fruits and vegetables — and, hopefully, to reduce her weight. After two years in the program, Alaijah is an unqualified success story: She lost five pounds the first year by snacking on fruits and vegetables, then eight pounds more ...

Study finds “staggering” health effect from eating veggies….

Mom was right: Eat LOTS of veggies. By Lenny Bernstein People who eat seven or more portions of fresh fruits and vegetables each day may reduce their risk of dying from a wide variety of diseases by as much as 42 percent over people who consume less than one portion, according to a new study by British researchers who tracked the eating habits of more than 65,000 people for 12 years. The study, released Monday evening in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ...

Is Fasting A Good Idea? Science Suggests Yes

By Charles Q. Choi1 Instead of eating three square meals a day, an eating schedule that involves "intermittent fasting" could help fight not just obesity but many related diseases of modern life, such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer's, researchers say. The advice given on fighting obesity usually focuses on consuming fewer calories and exercising more. The benefits of such foods as vegetables, fruits, nuts, fiber and fish, and the value of reducing or eliminating snacks ...

Michelle Obama, Will Ferrell Team Up For ‘Let’s Move!’ Focus Group

Michelle Obama's "Let's Move!" campaign is now four years old, so the First Lady teamed up with actor/comic Will Ferrell to hold a "focus group" for kids to see how much they know about healthy living. Turns out, maybe they know a little more than candy-chomping Will Ferrell. Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/25/michelle-obama-will-ferrell_n_4851014.html

Adapting staples to Nutrarian Diet

Written by Joel Fuhrman, M.D. In addition to focusing on G-BOMBS, following the high-nutrient nutritarian diet also means avoiding or minimizing the disease-causing foods in your diet: sugars, oils, white flour, animal products. If the Nutritarian eating style is new to you, you may feel a little lost in the kitchen without these familiar ingredients. How do you make salad dressing without oil? Creamy sauces without dairy? Tasty burgers without meat? Brownies without sugar, eggs or butter? ...

Lower is Better when it comes to LDL

New data fuels doctors’ demands to rewrite U.S. heart guidelines Reuters By Julie Steenhuysen and Bill Berkrot November 20, 2014 CHICAGO (Reuters) - Controversial heart disease prevention guidelines that abandoned specific targets for reducing "bad" LDL cholesterol are under fresh assault after a major study highlighted the benefits of taking LDL to very low levels. Guidelines issued last year by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology asked doctors to assess ...

What’s so bad about Gluten?

By Michael Specter Just after Labor Day, the Gluten and Allergen Free Expo stopped for a weekend at the Meadowlands Exposition Center. Each year, the event wends its way across the country like a travelling medicine show, billing itself as the largest display of gluten-free products in the United States. Banners hung from the rafters, with welcoming messages like “Plantain Flour Is the New Kale.” Plantain flour contains no gluten, and neither did anything else at the exposition (includ...